Articles

Homeopaths unable to take criticism: cry conspiracy instead of providing evidence

January 17 2011

Canadian homeopaths are angry.  Cries of conspiracy and persecution rang out over the internet in anticipation of CBC Marketplace’s exposé of homeopathic remedies this week, while skeptical groups celebrated the first major investigation of homeopathy in Canadian mainstream media.  Homeopathy, a pseudo-science purporting magical assertions, including that with a few shakes, water can retain the memory of a substance after it has been diluted far past detectable levels, is under attack; and it’s about time.

Why Scientism Isn't Science

Skeptic North, October 5 2010
 
To the dismay of scientists, the dreaded word ‘scientism’ has become a favorite of critics of the scientific method. Accusations of scientism, which are largely unjustified, can be heard from proponents of alternative medicine, homeopathic practitioners and everyone in between. So what is scientism and how is it different from science?

Intravenous Nutrient Therapy – Cure-all or Just One More Unproven Treatment?

Skeptical Inquirer, September 28, 2010
 
Recently there has been renewed interest among the general public in the use of intravenous (IV) nutrient therapy to treat a variety of ailments including chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, fibromyalgia, hay fever, chronic sinusitis, congestive heart failure, ischemic vascular disease, dementia,  bronchitis, multiple sclerosis, as well as viral and bacterial infections.  It has been suggested that serum concentrations of the nutrients reach much higher levels with IV therapy than can be achieved through oral consumption.  

Curmudgeon. Cynic. Skeptic

Skeptic North, September 28, 2010
 
If you were to ask a person on the street what a skeptic is, they will often use these words synonymously. Skepticism is seen as a knee-jerk negativity; a reflexive disbelief in the assertions made by others. The modern skeptical movement is concerned with much more than this.
 

Are Cell Phones and Wi-Fi Safe?

Calgary Herald & National Post, September 29, 2010
 
A group of parents recently petitioned the Barrie, Ont., school board to disconnect WiFi in their schools. They claimed that their children were suffering from a grab-bag of non-specific ailments such as nausea, headaches, dizziness and even heart palpitations. They blamed these symptoms on WiFi exposure. Their claims were backed up by statements from a couple of supposed “experts,” one of whom even has a PhD.
 

The Skeptics View of Alternative Medicine

National Post, July 9 2010
 
Alternative medicine is gaining popularity in Canada, especially for the treatment of chronic conditions. Many treatment modalities are endorsed by practitioners of alternative medicine: from nutritional supplements, to acupuncture, to magnetic bracelets. It is important to examine scientifically if these treatments works, and in so doing, we can see how skeptics examine the claims of alternative medicine.